Berlin, Europe, Germany

The Stones Of Berlin’s Holocaust Memorial.

September 16, 2011
The Stones of Berlin's Holocaust Memorial

In keeping with my promise to write more about my new home of Berlin, here’s a photo of the city’s Holocaust Memorial (or Holocaust-Mahnmal in German).

The Stones of Berlin's Holocaust Memorial
The memorial was built to commemorate the Jewish victims of the Holocaust and inaugurated in May 2005, some 60 years after the end of WWII. The memorial spans 19,000 square meters and contains 2,711 concrete blocks which are arranged in a “grid pattern on a sloping field“.

Designed by Peter Eisenman, it’s said that it’s arranged in such a way “to produce an uneasy, confusing atmosphere, and the whole sculpture aims to represent a supposedly ordered system that has lost touch with human reason.”

The building of the memorial was not without controversy as some people were offended that other Holocaust victims, such as those killed because of their sexual orientation, were not included in the commemoration. Others felt that the monument was a presentation of German shame or that it shouldn’t have taken so long for one to be constructed.

Regardless of what you may think about the memorial, it’s an interesting and sobering place to visit as you ponder the dark history that is not so long in the past.

Read more info about the Holocaust Memorial on Wikipedia and the controversy on BBC News.  Also learn more about other WWII memorials posted around the city of Berlin.

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4 Comments

  • Reply fotoeins September 17, 2011 at 12:04 am

    Lovely photo.

    Whenever I pass by the Holocaustdenkmal, my initial reaction is one of irritation when I see people playing, jumping over the stones, seemingly without a care to the reason for the memorial.

    However, I realize that this is a testament – that the wrongs of the past must be remembered, that we remain vigilant, that all of these people can come and visit and laugh and play, that life can in fact be celebrated as well.

    • Reply Cheryl Howard September 17, 2011 at 12:08 am

      I feel the exact same, as it’s not something that I’d ever do. Saw similar behavior when I toured Sachsenhausen earlier this summer … so disrespectful!

  • Reply Andrea September 17, 2011 at 1:39 pm

    What an interesting memorial – I will have to look for this when we visit Berlin later this year.

    • Reply Cheryl Howard September 17, 2011 at 9:40 pm

      It really is an interesting place. And sooo cool that you will be coming to Berlin! 🙂

    Leave a Reply to Andrea Cancel Reply